God’s Own Country (2017)

A depressed young man struggles to stay sober while working on his family’s farm.  His paralyzed father is unable to work and the demoralized son is being stretched too thin.  In an effort to help pick up the slack, the father hires a temporary Romanian laborer who helps keep the farm running smoothly and cures the son’s loneliness.

Mother! (2017)

 

A published poet, played by Javier Bardem, and his young wife, Jennifer Lawrence, are rebuilding his old country home that burned down.  Strangers begin to show up and turn their world upside down.  As usual, Darren Aronofski created a psychological thriller that keeps the audience guessing throughout the film.  With Aronofski the only thing you can expect, is the unexpected.

WALL·E (2008)

” Just needed someone to look after you, that’s all. “

Left alone on a planet, a trash compacting robot searches for meaning in an endless loop.  In a sea of meaningless nostalgia, Wall-E fantasizes about companionship and a sense of belonging.  His adventure leads him on a quest for love and to preserve hope that Earth will once again be inhabitable.  Wall-E provides a vision of a post-consumerist world, neglected and void of any responsibility.  It does this through vivid dystopian landscapes and social commentary that, at times, seems closer to reality than fiction.

Once Upon A Time In America (1984)

When I picked up Once Upon a Time in America I had no idea what it was about and certainly no idea how long it was.  I put off starting the film for a few days and then settled in.  The film is set between the 1920’s to the 1960’s and follows the life of David “Noodles” Aaronson, a Jewish gangster who grew up during prohibition, played by De Niro.  Noodles reluctantly returns to his childhood neighborhood and reflects on a life of excitement, passion, and betrayal.  Sergio Leone’s final film features a well-crafted and driving story line, masterfully executed suspense sequences, and elegant editing and camera work.

Man With a Movie Camera (Человек с кино-аппаратом) (1929)

Vertov’s Man With a Movie Camera captures a day in the life of the Russian proletariat in 1920’s Soviet Union.  The quick sequences and endless jump cuts depict several soviet union cities, including: Odessa, Kharkov and Kiev.1  The structure is experimental for its time by incorporating a wide range of shots and avant-garde film techniques as well as veering from the standard ‘stage’ plot.  Man With a Movie Camera simultaneously shows a broad day in the life of the proletariat while providing a glimpse behind the scenes of the making of the film.  At times the film even stops to show the editor, his wife Elizaveta Svilova, and begins again once she has completed her edit.  This film was aimed to expand and challenge the contemporary structure of film that was driven by staging, plot, and intertitles.  Man With a Movie Camera is the culmination of Vertov’s kinok movement to expand the artistic bounds of film.2  This legendary film stands the test of time with its creativity, juxtaposition, and challenge to the contemporary norm.