Get Out (2017)

Get out

Directed by: Jordan Peele

Cinematography: Toby Oliver

Starring: Daniel KaluuyaAllison WilliamsCatherine KeenerBradley WhitfordCaleb Landry Jones, and LilRel Howery

Runtime: 1h 44m

Genre: Horror, Mystery, Thriller

Rating: ♣♣♣♣

In an attempt to not spoil this movie I have my review in two sections.  The top section is more of a general response to the film and below that is a section where I dig into more specifics about the film that I want to unwind.  So do not read the whole thing if you want to avoid spoilers.

Jordan Peele’s Get Out is a psychological thriller that keeps you on your toes and unsure of where the characters stand the whole way through.  The story follows Chris, played by Daniel Kaluuya, and his girlfriend Rose, played by Allison Williams, as they visit her family in upstate New York.  No more information is needed.  Peele succeeds in taking the viewer on a comedic, thrilling, and satisfying ride.

Continue reading “Get Out (2017)”

Cat People (1942)

Directed by: Jacques Tourneur

Cinematography: Nicholas Musuraca

Starring: Simone SimonKent SmithTom ConwayJane Randolph

Runtime: 1h 13m

Genre: Fantasy, Horror, Thriller

Rating: ♣♣♣♣

 

With love and passion comes sin and strife, this is the theme throughout Jacques Tourneur’s Cat People.  Is the curse of the cat people a figment of their imagination, are they alive and well, or is there a panther on the loose?  Cat People tells the story of Irene and Oliver as they fall in love and reconcile the difficulties of marriage. Continue reading “Cat People (1942)”

Witch, The (2015)

Directed by: Robert Eggers

Cinematography: Jarin Blaschke

Starring: Anya Taylor-Joy, Ralph Ineson, Kate Dickie, Harvey Scrimshaw

Runtime: 1h 32m

Genre: Horror, Mystery

Rating: ♣♣♣♣

 

This directorial debut for Eggers was pretty intense.  I feel like this is what people were expecting when The Village, by M. Night Shyamalan, was released.  This film follows a puritan family exiled from their village to the edges of a forest.  The film shifts from a thriller to a horror relatively quickly and keeps us guessing as to what is going on until the absolute end.

The historical period piece has an amazing level of authenticity.  From the garb, to the vocabulary, to the dark lit misty ambiance, this film takes us back to the 17th century and traps us there.

The theme that resonated with me the most was the possible play on the seven deadly sins, or perhaps an antecedent.  The role of sin and punishment in the family’s world mixed with the mysteries of the unknown and inexplicable in a 17th century world makes certain reactions by the characters explainable, or at least understandable.

This film could be viewed a few different ways. One way, as a period piece about a family that has a run in with a witch with heavy religious overtones.  A reimagined metaphor, or old wives tale, to help explain tragedy, misfortune, and death in a world that lacks rigorous scientific analysis and is flush with the wrath of god.  Or, some other way…  The film left me trying to put together the pieces and I am not sure I fully absorbed everything that happened.